Free Hologram Generator Script (Download)

Download Crate’s Free Hologram Script here

Creating holograms in After Effects is about to get a lot more fun with the release of our latest script.

These effects are one of the most requested on ProductionCrate, our library of thousands of digital assets to help build your creative endeavours. We know that often you will need to control what’s projected in the hologram, which is why we released this tool to help you do exactly that.

Not only can you download it for free, but using it to create your After Effects hologram is a one-click process!

Download Free Hologram Script for After Effects

Every feature that you could possibly need was built into the script. This includes:


  • ColorDownload Free Hologram Script for After Effects
  • Glow
  • Projection Rays
  • Chromatic Aberration
  • Scan Lines
  • Displacement
  • Flicker
  • Signal Interference
  • Framerate
  • Pixelate
  • Blur
  • Sharpen

All properties are fully customisable, meaning no matter what style you were aiming for, you’ll get there.

If you wanted to save your customised hologram, you can also click Animation -> Save Animation Preset to be able to apply it to any other shots you may have.

And if you wanted to save time, you might be interested in checking out the presets that we have built into the script. You can navigate through these by clicking the arrows on the pop-up window. These have been built to mimic some of the most recognisable movie holograms, referencing Star Wars, Iron Mans HUD, Aquaman and more.

Download Free Hologram Script for After Effects

To download and install the script, open up After Effects and navigate through File -> Scripts -> Run Script File. Find a folder you wish to keep the script, then extract both the images folder and “Crates Camera Script.jsx” to the new location. Double click the .jsx file and you’ll be ready to create your holograms in an instant!

If you’re wanting to save even more time, you can download these HD hologram VFX assets for your video.

5 ways to connect Premiere Pro and After Effects

There are a variety of ways to connect Premiere Pro and After Effects. Premiere is used primarily for editing video and audio in a clean timeline. After Effects is most often used for Visual Effects and Motion Graphics. They are both available in the Adobe Suite and are essential tools for any video editors.

1.  Replace with After Effects Composition

File > Adobe Dynamic Link > Create New After Effects Composition

 

This replaces a clip with an After Effects Composition.

Use this option for long-form video, when you need to do something to a clip(s) that Premiere Pro can’t do, like 3D space, tracking, After Effects only effects and scripts, and difficult Warp stabilizer jobs. Both apps have Warp Stabilizer, but After Effects can remove tracking points that cause issues where PP doesn’t.

When using “Replace”, Duplicate the clip to the track above (option/alt and drag up) as the AE composition will replace the PP clip and this way you have the original clip if you change your mind. It is very difficult to go backwards later in your workflow, so this redundancy can prove extremely useful.

If you are looking to add an overlayed graphic then we suggest using a Color Matte in your Premiere timeline and stretching it to the length you need before replacing with a dynamic linked After Effects clip. You can right click it from your timeline and replace from there. Save your After Effects project and see it auto-update in Premiere!

 

2.   New After Effects Composition

File > Adobe Dynamic Link > New After Effects Composition

 

This creates a blank linked Composition in the project panel. Anything you create in AE will show up in PP. If you create text, it is now automatically editable in PP.

Let’s say you reopen PP for a new editing session. To edit the linked AE Comp, sect it in the project and press Command/Control + E, to edit the original AE file.

 

3. Import After Effects Composition (Dynamic Link).

File > Adobe Dynamic Link > Import After Effects Composition

 

This is useful when you want to use an animation or titles created in After Effects as a clip in Premiere Pro.

 

 

4. Import Premiere Pro project into After Effects.

File > Import > Premiere Pro Project

 

A dialog box opens with options: bring in all the sequences, select a sequence and whether or not you want to import audio.

This workflow is handy when you are doing short promo style videos in Premiere Pro, and want to finish in After Effects using third party plugins/scripts and features Premiere Pro doesn’t have (3D, tracking and advanced VFX for example).

It is easier to work with audio in Premiere Pro, and your audio markers for sequences and clips will be sent over to After Effects.

 

 

5. Create Templates in After Effects and Modify in Premiere Pro

Select Composition in Project, then Composition > Open in Essential Graphics.

 

You can also use the Essential Graphics Workspace.

In the Essential Graphics Panel, select the Composition that you want to create a template from.

Click “Solo Selected Properties” to add properties you want to be able to modify in your template.

Drag them to the Essential Graphics Panel. Name your Template, and click “Export Motion Graphics Template”.

You can now open the template in Premiere Pro and modify it there.

 

 

 

 

 

Download New Cloud VDBs Set

We have 10 Production-Ready Cloud VDB’s ready for you to download.

These video effects were built in Houdini and are compatible with most 3D software. Load these VDB’s quickly into your scene using your renderer or plugin of choice.

This set of 10 includes the most commonly seen cloud shapes. You can mix them together for cloudy days and rotate them for an endless variety of options. These clouds also work wonderfully as storm clouds. Use a light with some randomized position parameters and have your light flash and fade over 15 or so frames. Place your light within your cloud VDB and you have quickly created your own storm-clouds!


We are having a great time building out FootageCrate assets based off of these VDBs. If you have an aerial shot you want to make more interesting by flying through some clouds or a CGI shot that calls for some interesting sky scenes then these FX are right for you.

We also have two other VDB categories already built out. Our Mega Tornado pack will let you create your own doomsday, while our mist pack is perfect for those SciFi and fantasy projects.

Using VFX Assets in 60fps (After Effects + Premiere Pro)

So you’ve embarked on a video editing project at 60fps? Here’s a little thing you might want to know!

For those who need an introduction, the “fps” refers to how quickly a video will switch between individual pictures to create the illusion of a movement, which begins at roughly 15 frames per second.

So why would you want to create a 60fps project if most video formats are at a standard 24-30fps? For one simple reason: it’s satisfyingly silky smooth.

60 FPS Comparison GIF

Other than it’s an impressive visual effect, it can also help out for a variety of purposes. For example, gameplay videos are often recorded at 60fps since the games strive for immersion, and so this smooth playback helps gives the game a more natural look.

Another case is for motion graphics, where a clean art style compliments the fluid framerate. This is common in infographics, such as a personal favourite from the YouTube channel Kurzgesagt.

So what do you need to do to your ProductionCrate workflow to make the assets you download fit into your scene? As you may know, most of our FootageCrate elements are 30fps, so here is what we suggest to make it work.

Introducing a much-loved technique, time interpolation! This handy tool is the computer taking a guess at what is happening between two images. From the guess, it then creates an image which is what it predicts the image to look like halfway between the first and the second image. This means you can convert a 30fps asset into 60fps, as the software will create the 30 extra frames out of thin air. We need to apply the interpolation to the 30fps asset to convert it to 60fps.

60FPS Explosion

Most mid-tier editing software supports this. Here’s how you’ll find them:

After Effects

– Right-click on the ProductionCrate asset, go through Effects -> Time -> Time Warp.

– Set the speed to 50%, and make sure your project is in 60fps.

Premiere Pro

– Right-click on your ProductionCrate asset, and select “Speed/Duration”.

– Adjust the speed parameter to 50%.

– Choose Optical Flow as the Time Interpolation method.

Congratulations, your video is now as smooth as butter!

60FPS Motion Graphics Subscribe Button

If you’re interested in levelling up your compositing skills, you might also be interested in our recent rotoscoping course!

Achieve True Cinematic Footage with log

What do people mean when they say ‘cinematic’?

You’ve seen the videos suggesting harsh color-grading, or the tutorials that tell you to just throw on some aspect-ratio bars. The truth is, there is no simple one-step solution. Quality footage shot with dynamic range will allow you to create the exact look you want. There are the shooting-steps and then the post processing-steps, you have to work on both if you are going to improve your videos.

Today you’ll get to learn a bit about shooting with log. Alex and Alexsa from Crate’s Camera Corner will break down the basics for utilizing this powerful feature available on many consumer cameras.

The true definition of log can be a bit confusing, so let me try and summarize it. Log images look washed out and flat. Suffice it to say you will not like the look of footage shot with log. At least, not until you color it. Log footage is made to be extremely dynamic, storing color and luminosity with loads of depth, allowing you to truly hone in on whatever look you would like to achieve. Yes, that does mean log footage requires more work than you might be used to. If you’re shooting a vlog you probably won’t want to shoot with log, but if you’re shooting a film or client video then log may be right for you.

create cinematic footage with log

Alex and Alexsa shoot with Sony, so they use the S-Log2 setting. Different cameras will have different log formats. Shooting log does take practice, we don’t suggest you try it when the stakes are high. Instead shoot some test footage, or if you are a Pro User you can download this aerial clip shot with log and practice your coloring in post.

An important thing to note is that you need to nail your exposure if you’re shooting with log. It is less forgiving than out of the box picture profiles or standard color outputs. We only suggest you shoot log if you know how to get properly exposed shots and are willing to take the time in post production to hone in on your color.

Check out the first episode of Crate’s Camera Corner

 

Want to know more? Alex will show you his workflow and approach to coloring in Premiere Pro including how to build your own LUT to load onto your external monitor.

The aerial stock elements Alex mentions can be found here

Want to know the top 5 Mistakes Videographers make on their websites? Check this article out

Epic Sound Effects

Some moments just need to be epic.

Maybe your hero makes the ultimate sacrifice, saving everyone else in the process. Or perhaps your hero is about to hold the holy relic, untouched by man for thousands of years. These moments can only be as epic as the sound accompanying them.  That’s why we decided to build the Epic Sound Design category. Monks and choirs, trailer hits, angels singing and drums beating are all available for you to use in your projects.

Here are some examples of what is available:

Angelic Choir

 

Monk’s Choir

 

Trailer Hit Riser Ghostly

 

Don’t let your epic scenes fall flat. Make your scenes epic, here are some of our favorite all-time epic scenes! Can you name them all?

 

 

 

 

 

Quickstart Guide to Audio in Premiere Pro

In this QSG, we look at working with audio for filmmakers, editors, and mograph artists.

Here are the essentials you need to know to quickly create high-quality audio in Premiere Pro.

 

Clipping is Bad

Premiere Pro measures audio in decibels. The audio should never hit 0 decibels on the meter, which causes clipping. Clipping is bad and causes the distortion of your audio.

Recorded music often comes in hot (clipping) so I generally reduce the volume in the project before putting the clips into a sequence. Put all your music clips in one bin (its a folder, all the other Adobe apps call them folders). Press G to bring up Audio Gain, so you can change the loudness/gain for all the tracks at once. Experiment with this, but generally setting your music to -20ish is a good starting point if you have narration/dialogue with it. If you are just cutting to music, you could pick “normalize max peaks to -6, ensuring the music a good level but that it won’t clip. As a general guide,  you want your main audio to average around -12 and not peak above -6.

 

Clipped Audio in Premiere Pro

 

Audio Gain in Premiere Pro

Changing the Volume of a clip in a sequence.

The line on the audio waveform shows you the clip volume.

 

 

I can drag the line up and down to change the volume, but its not a very exact way to work. Press the left and right bracket keys to lower/raise the volume 1 decibel.

Adding Shift will lower/raise the Audio 6 decibels. (this can be changed in Preferences > Audio)

 

If you want to manually keyframe the audio volume, Hold Command/Control and click on the line to add points.

Audio keyframes on a clip

 

Clip vs Track Audio

There are 2 types of Audio adjustments in Premiere Pro: clip level and track level.

Clip Level Adjustments – Dragging the clip audio line up and down,  the Audio Clip Mixer, the Essential Sound Panel.

Generally, you are working with audio on a clip level. To work on a track level, use the “Audio Track Mixer”.

If I move the fader for a track in the Audio Track Mixer”, I’m changing the volume for the whole track.

You will need to change the view to track from clip keyframes to track keyframes to see the audio changes you make in the track mixer.

 

Changing track volume

The track mixer is handy if you want to apply an audio effect(s) to all the clips on a track, and when you are doing a submix (grouping tracks like multiple SFX tracks so all the tracks are treated as one).

 

Applying audio effects to a track

 

 

 

Essential Sound Panel

The Essential Sound Panel was added in 2017, and offers a unified interface for working with audio.

Adobe has done a similar thing with graphics and color correction, adding the Essential Graphics and Lumetri Panels.

To get started, switch to the Audio workspace which automatically brings up the sound panel.

Then select the”Audio Type”  you want to adjust in the sequence.  Selecting the appropriate audio type

then allows you to pick from a variety presets or to manually make adjustments.

 

 

If you are new to audio, the presets are the best place to start. Experiment with them till you get a sense of how they work. Unchecking the boxes in the presets is a good way to hear what each setting does.

One of the features I use the most is the automatic ducking feature. This drops the music’s volume when you have narration, dialogue, SFX with the music clip. Select a music clip, pick the Music Preset, then one of the ducking presets. If I have multiple audio clips above the music (narration, dialogue, SFX), I start with the “duck against everything’ preset as it will react to all the audio clips.

The Noise Reduction Preset is essential when recording video/audio in an uncontrolled (not a studio) environment. Select a narration or dialogue clip, pick the Dialogue “Audio Type’. and select “clean yo noisy dialogue preset.

Loudness “Auto-Match” will set the “perceived loudness” of all the selected clips to be the same and is a quick way to make multiple clips sound even.

Using the essential Sound Panel will allow to quickly tweak your audio mixes, and production crate has a large selection of royalty-free music, SFX, and ambiances with new collections released often. If you have any questions, post them in the comments or in the forum.

 

Reduce Noise Preset

 

Easily learn all these steps in this video!

 

If you want to learn some advanced techniques using Apple’s Logic Pro X consider reading this article.