Download 4K Particle Shockwave Motion Graphics

Download the 4K particle shockwave VFX assets here. 


We’ve expanded our collection of particle shockwave effects, all ready to download and import to your video.

These stylish assets feature sudden radial bursts of wispy smoke, being a perfect addition to your visual effects and motion graphics.

To maximise the detail, the particle shockwaves are available in up to 4K resolution. This allows you to scale and position these effects anywhere in your composition while maintaining high quality.

 

These are best composited using a screen or additive blending mode. In some of our file formats, the particle shockwaves have the alpha channel built-in. speeding up your compositing workflow.

We provide these in 4 file formats:

  • Zipped PNG sequence
  • Zipped ProRes
  • MOV (PNG)
  • MP4

This will allow you to import these particle shockwave effects into almost any video editing software, including After Effects, Hitfilm, Nuke, Vegas Pro and more.

Not only can these be great for motion graphics, but also for visual effects, such as in meteor impacts, sci-fi weapon muzzle flashes, or explosions!

Download 4K Particle Shockwave VFX Assets

Download these particle shockwave VFX assets today, and access the thousands of other assets available from ProductionCrate’s digital asset library.

If you’re interested in our similar content, check out our magic power accent VFX.

Youtuber Raz “Mr. AMG” Rehan Interview

Youtube has it all. Big studio work, family videos, instructional tutorials of every kind, cats, more cats, meditation walkthroughs, music videos, gaming screencap, reviews and so much more. It’s absolutely massive. Youtube, more than any platform, has helped of connect people through their curiosity. It enables you to pursue, learn, teach and be entertained.

 

I don’t consider myself a ‘car person’, but that might be changing. I have watched an absurd amount of Remove Before Race in a very short period. It’s a Youtube channel that utilizes VFX, humor and impressive production-quality to review awesome cars. I had the privilege of interviewing Raz Rehan, the host of RBR. He tells us how he built a growing and successful Youtube channel, with over 150K subscribers, and where he wants go go next.

 

Here’s a great episode of RBR, full interview below!

 

 

Chris: Can you tell our viewers a bit about your channel?

 

Raz: Sure! Remove Before Race is on the face of it a car review channel like many others, but it has a big twist!

 

Alongside seeing reviews of the latest and greatest cars, we also use VFX to take the traditional car review to the next level. So if we talk about the engine then we’ll strip the body away in front of your eyes, or if we talk about another car we‘ll teleport it there in seconds. Its car reviews, just more fun!

 

Chris: What motivated the idea of using visual effects in your videos?  

 

Raz: I’m a big geek! I love film, TV, video games and comic books. So back when the channel was younger I experimented with incorporating that side of me into the content. It ended up really resonating with our viewers, who also love Star Wars, Mario, the Avengers and whatever else we throw into our videos as a surprise.

 

It’s given me a great USP, hence why FootageCrate is so invaluable to me: I just end up getting so many ideas from here!

 

Chris: That’s awesome to hear! Do you have any FootageCrate Effects you couldn’t find that you want us to create?


Raz: The more movie, super hero and video game effects the better for my channel! Really helps create themes around videos and keep things exciting. Perhaps even simple things like more animal renderings. Though top of my list would be a service that allows you to request the creation of a unique effect : that would be special!

 

Chris: For creators looking to build a Youtube Channel, do you have any suggestions?

 

Raz: Too many to give in one answer, but I’ll try! First and foremost, chase excellence of product, and success will follow! If you chase numbers you’re sure to fail, but make excellent content and it’s hard for viewers to ignore you.

 

Secondly, be yourself! It’s cliche, but by harnessing the power of my own nerdiness I  stumbled on the perfect unique niche for my channel. And don’t let what others are doing in your area of the market dissuade or effect you, focus on your craft.

 

Chris: Where do you want your channel to be in 5 years?

 

Raz: I’d love to have expanded the type of content we do, into some episodic car review series with our signature VFX, or heck even into things non-automotive!

 

But really most of all, I hope our library of old videos by that point, will be a joy to watch back.

 

 

 

 

Chris: I noticed you had some great sponsors for your videos, do you have any tips for finding sponsors?

 

Raz: Sponsors are firmly linked to quality of content for me, so as I said about, chase the quality and the demand will follow. There’s also no harm in asking companies that you see synergy with, and just starting a conversation!


Chris: Thanks, Raz!

If you’re into cars, or just want to see some high-quality work, check out RBR on Youtube.

Interview with Jared Rowe – VFX Artist and Motion Designer

I came across Jared’s work not so long ago and was instantly impressed by his style and skill. Jared was kind enough to take the time to answer a few questions for us. If you’re looking to enter the field of Visual Effects or Motion Graphics then this interview is a must-read. Jared’s answers were enlightening and honest, and are helpful whether you’re just starting out or have been working in the field for as many years as I have.

 

Chris:

Thanks for doing this Q&A, Jared! Love your portfolio and all the work you’ve been doing. What software do you tend to use most often for your VFX and Motion Design work?

 

Jared:

Thanks, Chris! Stoked to be noticed and share my story.

 

Adobe After Effects is my compositing tool of choice, complemented with various plugins and scripts. All depending on the project I’m working on, of course.

 

If we’re talking my favorite workflow, that usually starts with either Cinema 4D or a similar 3D application which I use to create my main scene work – then finish with compositing and effects in After Effects.

 

I’ll admit though, I’m a sucker for experimenting with a wide range of software types. I even used the Unreal Engine recently for a big Esports client! With Unreal I was able to compile a 3D environment, which I then transferred to After Effects. I mixed in a barrage of ProductionCrate compositing effects, together with some of my own that I’ve created over the years. The final product turned out pretty awesome. The video below gives you a brief look into the making. 

 

 

Chris:

A lot of our users are interested in pursuing a career in this field. Any tips for getting started?

 

Jared:

Especially for new artists, there is an overemphasis and over-reliance on tools. I remember early on in my career, many in the community determined ‘skill’ by the software you used or the conferences you attended. I’ve seen this trend diminish recently, but there is still this expectation that you are required to have a specific application or plugin to be the best at what you do. This is false.

 

For me, the greatest teacher hasn’t been a course, or a mentor, or a YouTube tutorial. My greatest teacher has been failure. Don’t get me wrong, there are some incredible resources out there for learning to master specific effects and techniques. But there is no ‘one way’ to do anything in this field. 

 

The best way to build real-world skill is to get out there and just do it. You’re never going to be any good until you’ve tried and failed. And I mean failed a lot. You need to fail in your own unique way, on your own unique projects. And no tutorial is going to teach you that.

 

Here’s a fun anecdote to illustrate my point. I once worked on a project for Disney, where I needed to pull off a dynamic water effect on a super-quick deadline. I wouldn’t have the time for liquid simulation, so I needed to think resourcefully. I decided to take my iPhone and go out to our office sink. I turned off the lights and recorded a simple setup, recreating the intended water movement. I recorded the scene in slow motion, using only the light on my camera. Little did I know that this simple solution would far exceed expectations. After compositing the capture into my scene, the end result was even better than any water simulation would have been.

 

I like to share this story because we learn best in these resourceful moments. And it is going to take a few big moments like these in your career to build your arsenal and confidence as a visual artist. My advice is to try your best to pull off a big idea, whether you know how or not. In doing so, you will figure out a way. At first, it may not seem like the ideal ‘way’, but over time these experiences will add up and lead to mastery.

Chris:

Did you go to school, or are you self-taught?

 

Jared: 

A mix of both. I suffered a football injury in high school which left me on crutches for a long time. That free time gave me an opportunity to focus on video editing, which was my favorite hobby and eventual career path.

 

I began as an intern at a local access television station, then continued my education at the Valencia Film Program back in 2005. At the time, my passion was cinematography. In particular, I loved using scene lighting to tell a story, through setting, blocking, and practical light solutions. It was an incredible experience being on set for 36 hours and witnessing a film set in action. I really learned to appreciate everything that goes into film production. 

 

It was my film experience that inspired me to branch into animation and motion design. I came to a realization; telling a story in the film industry was incredibly complex, with lots of moving parts. You need a LOT of people working simultaneously to turn your vision into a reality. On the other hand, I was finding that motion design allowed me to bypass a lot of these complexities. I started dabbling in CGI environments and animation, telling my own stories that were just as effective as those on set – only made in a fraction of the time and with more creative freedom. It quickly became my favorite art form of storytelling and expression.

 

From here my skills became almost entirely self-taught. The passion was there and I saw my talents improving rapidly. I became obsessed with improving my techniques, soaking up every bit of knowledge I could. I imagine this is a natural progression for most motion artists. No matter your formal education, at one point or another you’ll experience that ‘lightswitch’ moment. The ‘self-teaching’ instinct suddenly takes over out of passion and a desire to master your craft.

 

Chris: I love what you and the people at Visuals by Impulse are doing. Were you freelancing before working at VBI?

 

Jared:

Thanks, Chris. It’s been a wild ride for VBI. To date we’ve worked with over 60,000 streamers, gamers, and creators. Across Twitch, YouTube, and Facebook Gaming, VBI is raising the bar on branding and visual presentation. Internally, we’re lucky to have an incredibly talented team and strong leadership. What impresses me the most though, is the company culture. It’s one of the most unique and strongest I’ve ever experienced in a remote team (and an international one, at that!).

 

 

Personally, it’s been many years since my last freelancing experience. For the past 15+ years, I’ve been partnered with my brother, Derek Alan Rowe. Together we founded the company Doctrine Creative, a creative team focusing on VR/AR and interactive experiences. 

 

More recently, I spent four years with Eezy as their Director of Video. There I worked to build Videezy’s libraries of free stock videos and After Effects templates. It was a dream come true to give back to the design community; a community that I had learned so much from over the years. But then VBI showed up and offered me the role of Marketplace Director. I couldn’t say no

 

It’s all been history since then. With VBI it’s an opportunity to innovate and – essentially – reinvent the world of broadcast design. The timing couldn’t be much better. Live streaming and esports gaming is growing faster than ever before. I count myself very fortunate to be part of that movement.

 

Chris: Any big projects on the horizon?

 

Jared:

Big time. 2020 is going to be a big year for Visuals by Impulse. We have ambitious plans to take streaming into an entirely new space; a next level. No spoilers yet, but it will be big. And it will affect both our graphics library and custom design services. 

 

Over the years, VBI has been lucky to team up with some of the biggest celebrities and brands in the game. This January we unveiled a new collaboration with 100 Thieves, the legendary organization founded by Call of Duty legend Nadeshot. You can check out some of our work in their new studio tour below! Stay tuned – there’s much more in the works that I’m stoked to reveal.

On the flip side, my brother Derek and I have been working on an exciting new project. We were recently awarded an Epic Games grant for our WildEyes project – an initiative focused on connecting people to the natural world through technology. The goal is to produce an immersive new VR experience using the Unreal Engine. It’s a daunting task for sure, but something we’re both stoked to see through.

 

Needless to say, it’s going to be an exciting year for myself and the entire VBI team.

 

Chris: I first came across your work after noticing you were using ProductionCrate goodies. Do you have any favorite assets?

 

Jared:

Some time ago, I stumbled upon ProductionCrate while working on an experimental project. I was looking to achieve some very specific effects, without having to invest time creating them from scratch myself. Some lightning and magic assets, if I remember correctly. ProductionCrate had exactly what I was looking for, and much more. I immediately saw the potential for my workflow; not only for this project, but for future projects as well.

 

I’ve spent enough time in this industry to understand the importance of a high-quality effects directory. Over the years I’ve developed a lot of my own baked effects and backgrounds, for use in compositing over time. But ProductionCrate dwarfed my own library, and I’ve kept coming back ever since that first encounter.

 

For me, the real beauty of ProductionCrate is the impact on my efficiency. I can achieve my overall scene without having to reinvent the wheel, saving me loads of time and energy. This allows me to focus on higher priorities, like the overall direction, composition, and feel of my work. 

 

It’s also an excellent tool for previsualization. I often use ProductionCrate assets during early project stages, inserting placeholder effects to sell the overall idea of my pieces. It’s a win-win; clients and teammates can easily grasp the story, without requiring massive time investment on my part. For this fact alone, ProductionCrate is essential to my creative pipeline.

 

Chris: Thanks, Jared! 

Blood Explosion Video Effects

Download 4K Blood Explosion VFX Assets here.


These new Bloody Explosion Effects are pretty intense. They’re almost comically excessive and extravagant. Blood mist and splatter, soft body dynamics and realistic jiggle, dust elements and ground-splashes all add to the absurdity that makes these effects unique.

We love action-comedy. Some scenes are so over the top that you just have to shake your head and smile. Check out our video showcasing some of these effects and what sets them apart from anything else we’ve made.

We’ve made over 30 of these video effects. Pro Users have access to 4K Blood Explosions. Basic Users can download 3 of these new VFX for free.

While overblown was the goal, we still made these to be professional-grade effects. The Mini Blood Explosions will let you customize your bursts, you can cover up any seams or start the explosion in various points. The full Body Blood Explosions come with a shadow catcher, the fully combined elements and realistic lighting.

Adaptable lighting has been built into these assets so that they fit into your footage with minimal compositing. The different variations we provide will also give you the freedom to specifically choose which one best matches your scene.

You can import and use these blood effects in most compositing programs, such as Adobe After Effects, Premiere Pro, Nuke, Hitfilm and more.

Download these blood VFX assets today, and show us what you create with them!

If you’re interested in even more horror related video effects, check out our high-quality blood graphic textures from GraphicsCrate.

Crate’s Heat Radiation After Effects Plugin – Free Download

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects here.


ProductionCrate is releasing a free plugin for Adobe After EffectsHeat Radiation.

We’ve lost count of the number of times that we have added any fire-based effect to our VFX. Maintaining realistic colours is always a challenge for artists, as different fire VFX assets often have different styles that are inconsistent with each other. This is where our After Effects plugin comes in!

This tool is a powerful colouring plugin to help you composite your fire, explosions, lava, stars and anything else that glows hot.

It creates consistent colours which accurately follow the rules of black-body radiation, which defines the properties of light emitted from hot objects.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

The results created from plus plugin can then overlay the background footage using a screen or add blending mode.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

Here’s how it works:

  • Create the input layer. The brightness of the pixels will represent the temperature you believe it should be (for example, a fire input will be brighter than its surroundings).
  • In most cases, using a solid-composite effect to avoid the background emitting any light will create desirable results.
  • Apply Crate’s Heat Radiation effect! The default values should instantly provide stylish results.
  • From here you can further adjust the parameters until you’re happy.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

We wanted to design this plugin accurately represent the real world, and so the temperature-based parameters are in Kelvin. This means that you can input measured values and be given colours that you will expect to see.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

We’ve extended the limits far enough to reach the surprising phase where the light emitted from a hot object turns blue. This can be useful for plasma, stars, jet-exhausts and more.


Here’s a breakdown of the most useful parameters you will come across in this After Effects plugin:

Max Temperature

This controls the temperature that a white pixel in your input will represent. The minimum temperature will also perform the same, but for the black pixels. You should aim to use temperatures that you expect the scene to have in the real world.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

Temperature Offset

This shifts the entire minimum and maximum temperature output by a specified value. It can be useful if you want to increase the overall temperature of a scene.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

Gamma

Creates additional contrast and intensity in the result.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

Yellow Influence

We recognise that not all black-body emitting objects are perfect, and have included this to allow you to adjust the intensity of the yellow in the output. This is especially useful in flames and explosions.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

Black Falloff

The value of the black falloff will define the temperature of a pixel that is at 100% brightness. Anything between this and the Black Point will be linearly interpolated towards 0% brightness.

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects


A useful tip for using this plugin is to apply a curves adjustment before the Heat Radiation effect. This will allow you to precisely control the intensity and contrast of the inputs for quick manipulation of the final output.

Windows Installation

To install the plugin, simply navigate to your Adobe After Effects folder (C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe After Effects CC 2019\Support Files\Plug-ins) and insert “HeatRadiation.aex”.

Mac Installation

 

To install the plugin to a Mac device, locate your Adobe After Effects folder (/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Common/Plug-ins/7.0/MediaCore/ProductionCrate) and insert “HeatRadiation.bundle”.

 

Download the free Heat Radiation plugin for After Effects

We hope you enjoy creating even more spectacular projects with this free After Effects plugin. If you’re interested in more content, check out all of our scripts and plugins for Adobe After Effects here.