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5 Premiere Pro Time Saving Tips

Saving time is essential for any editor. Here are 5 tips when working in Premiere Pro’s Project Panel

 

1) Create a Bin (folder) structure and organize your footage before you start editing.

The more complicated your project is, the more important this step is.  Create folders to sort your footage (interviews, b-roll/cutaways, voice-over, music, etc.).

I like to let the computer do the tedious work, so I save time by using Production Crate’s free “Hierarchy Extension“. Download the extension, install it (the Extension works in Premiere Pro and After Effects), and then find it under Window > Extensions > Crates Folder Hierarchy extension (see below). It has options for creating a simple or complex bin/folder structure in Premiere Pro as well as creating a folder structure for the project files on your hard drive!

 

When you select the Extension you will see this window pop up. You can create a folder structure instantly right inside of Premiere or a folder structure on your computer.

 

2) Use Subclips to make long clips more manageable.

Command/Control + U – Make Subclip

If you are working with clips that are long, break the long clips into shorter clips so you don’t have to search through the long clip every time you load the clip into the Source Panel.

Set an In and Out, (Hotkeys are I and O) then Command/Control + H to “Make Subclip”.

Leave “Restrict Trims” unchecked if you want to to be able to use transitions.

 

 

Here you can see the original full clip and the new subclip that we generated right below it.

 

3) Create Custom Sequence Presets

File > New > New Sequence

Pick the preset you want to start with, then click on the Tracks tab.

Specify the number of video/audio tracks you want, and name your audio tracks.

Click “save Preset” and you have a custom preset. This is a huge time saver if you have a specific sequence setting you use often. We have presets for our various social media aspect ratios as well as our standard video

 

You can easily name and save your track presets for further customization, or simply customize the sequence presets.

 

 

Once you have created your preset(s) they will be visible and available on your Sequence Presets drop-down menu.

 

4) Customizing List View

This is another big time saver. Having Thumbnails and Preview Area on will allow you to see what you are working with easier.

To add Thumbnails and Preview Area, Check “Preview Area” and Thumbnails” from the Project pull-down menu.

5) Create a Search Bin

Creating bins based on metadata is a big time saver.

This lets you create a Search Bin based on criteria you enter. In my example, I typed in png, which put all my png files into a bin which I could then name.

 

Here you can see I created a folder called PNG – Backgrounds and all of my PNG files were instantly added to that folder (or bin in Premiere).

 

Check out this fantastic article for connecting Premiere with After Effects.

 

Using VFX Assets in 60fps (After Effects + Premiere Pro)

So you’ve embarked on a video editing project at 60fps? Here’s a little thing you might want to know!

For those who need an introduction, the “fps” refers to how quickly a video will switch between individual pictures to create the illusion of a movement, which begins at roughly 15 frames per second.

So why would you want to create a 60fps project if most video formats are at a standard 24-30fps? For one simple reason: it’s satisfyingly silky smooth.

60 FPS Comparison GIF

Other than it’s an impressive visual effect, it can also help out for a variety of purposes. For example, gameplay videos are often recorded at 60fps since the games strive for immersion, and so this smooth playback helps gives the game a more natural look.

Another case is for motion graphics, where a clean art style compliments the fluid framerate. This is common in infographics, such as a personal favourite from the YouTube channel Kurzgesagt.

So what do you need to do to your ProductionCrate workflow to make the assets you download fit into your scene? As you may know, most of our FootageCrate elements are 30fps, so here is what we suggest to make it work.

Introducing a much-loved technique, time interpolation! This handy tool is the computer taking a guess at what is happening between two images. From the guess, it then creates an image which is what it predicts the image to look like halfway between the first and the second image. This means you can convert a 30fps asset into 60fps, as the software will create the 30 extra frames out of thin air. We need to apply the interpolation to the 30fps asset to convert it to 60fps.

60FPS Explosion

Most mid-tier editing software supports this. Here’s how you’ll find them:

After Effects

– Right-click on the ProductionCrate asset, go through Effects -> Time -> Time Warp.

– Set the speed to 50%, and make sure your project is in 60fps.

Premiere Pro

– Right-click on your ProductionCrate asset, and select “Speed/Duration”.

– Adjust the speed parameter to 50%.

– Choose Optical Flow as the Time Interpolation method.

Congratulations, your video is now as smooth as butter!

60FPS Motion Graphics Subscribe Button

If you’re interested in levelling up your compositing skills, you might also be interested in our recent rotoscoping course!

Fluid Ink Transition Effects

Download 4K HD ink fluid effects here.

Video transitions are one of the critical aspects of editing, connecting two different shots together. Since the dawn of digital editing, we have seen creators begin to take transitions even more seriously than before, especially in the vlog format.

Whip-pans, spins, fades and light leaks have all become a popular choice for Premiere Pro editors, but one other is a particular favourite of ours. Fluid transitions!

4K Fluid Ink Transitions for Premiere Pro

Otherwise known as ink bleeds, these can be some of the most stylish and beautiful effects, and add a whole new dynamic to your video.

To make your own, you’ll need three things. Your clips, an editing platform, and one of our fluid ink transition effects (which you can download here).

4K Fluid Ink Transitions for Premiere Pro

It’s then as simple as setting your clips alpha to match the brightness) of our transition effect. This can be done by placing the effect above your second clip and adding a “Track Matte Key” to the clip you’re fading into. You then select the ink-effect in the “Matte” option.

4K Fluid Ink Transitions for Premiere Pro

4K Fluid Ink Transitions for Premiere Pro

The “composite using” is what this effect uses to calculate the alpha value of the second clip, and since our ink effect is black and white, we’ll be using the luma value as our source.

Have fun with these awesome 4K ink fluid effects. If you want to hear about more ways you can use our range of effects, take a look at our blog!